reside


reside
reside, live, dwell, sojourn, lodge, stay, put up, stop can all mean to abide in a particular place as one's habitation or domicile. Reside and live express this idea, often without further implications.
Usually, however, when the term is intended to suggest the fixed, settled, or legal abode of a person or group such as a family, reside is the more appropriate word; when the idea to be emphasized is the spending of one's time in a given place and the carrying on of the normal activities of one's way of life, live is more explicit
{

the senator resides in San Francisco but he lives for the better part of the year in Washington

}
When the reference is not to persons but to things, reside is the term to be used when the thing referred to is a quality, an element, or a condition
{

the power of decision resides in the electorate

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{

his peculiar merit as a critic . . . resided in the combination of this personal gusto and curiosity— T. S. Eliot

}
{

when we have in our minds the idea of art as imitation, we are prone to think of beauty as residing in particular objects, particular colors— Binyon

}
When the thing is something concrete and the idea of making one's abode or home is suggested, live may be used
{

they say that sherry ought to live for a while in an old brandy-cask, so as to contract a certain con-vincing quality from the cask's genial timbers— Montague

}
Dwell is a close synonym of these words
{

more people than he could count (and yet, he thought, less than had dwelled in his own town)— Forestery

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but it is more frequently found in elevated language
{

she dwelt among the untrodden ways beside the springs of Dove— Wordsworthy

}
In extended use dwell carries a stronger implication of abiding (as in thought or in spirit)
{

the bad poet dwells partly in a world of objects and partly in a world of words, and he never can get them to fit— T. S. Eliot

}
{

these men had dwelt so long in that weariness they called success— R. H. Newman

}
Sojourn differs from the preceding terms in usually implying a temporary habitation or abode or a more or less uncertain place or way of living
{

for what purpose, it may be asked, was the world created, and immortal spirits sent to sojourn in it— Inge

}
Lodge (see also HARBOR) also implies an abode for a time or for the time being; it typically also implies having restricted accommodations (as in a hotel or rooming house) often without meals
{

he lodges at the Y.M.C.A. when he is in town

}
{

a convenience to me as well as to him if he would lodge on the cot in the spare room— Davis

}
Stay is the term commonly used in language in place of sojourn and often of lodge
{

he is staying at Miami Beach for the winter

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{

whenever he was in Paris he stayed at that hotel

}
Put up is also a common equivalent for lodge and usually suggests the status of a guest either in a hotel or in a private home
{

two seasons ago I put up at a farmhouse— T. H. White

}
{

where does he put up when he is in Chicago?

}
Stop, which is often used in the sense of stay
{

he is stopping at the largest hotel in the city

}
often specifically implies the breaking of a trip or journey by a short stay
{

where shall we stop for the night?

}
Analogous words: remain, abide (see STAY): *continue, endure

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • reside — I verb abide, be located, be quartered, be situated, become a citizen, bide, domicile, domiciliate, dwell, establish oneself, habitare, have an address, incolere, indwell, inhabit, inhabitare, live, live at, lodge, occupy, remain, settle, sojourn …   Law dictionary

  • Reside — Re*side (r? z?d ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Resided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Residing}.] [F. r[ e]sider, L. residere; pref. re re + sedere to sit. See {Sit}. ] 1. To dwell permanently or for a considerable time; to have a settled abode for a time; to abide …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reside in — index inhabit, occupy (take possession) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • reside — mid 15c., to settle, from O.Fr. resider, from L. residere to remain behind, rest, from re back, again + sedere to sit (see SEDENTARY (Cf. sedentary)). Meaning to dwell permanently first attested 1570s …   Etymology dictionary

  • reside — [v] live or exist in abide, be intrinsic to, be vested, bide, consist, continue, crash*, dig*, dwell, endure, hang one’s hat*, inhabit, inhere, lie, locate, lodge, nest, occupy, park*, people, perch, populate, remain, rest with, roost, settle,… …   New thesaurus

  • reside — ► VERB 1) have one s permanent home in a particular place. 2) (of a right or legal power) belong to a person or body. 3) (of a quality) be present or inherent in something …   English terms dictionary

  • reside — [ri zīd′] vi. resided, residing [ME resyden < MFr resider < L residere < re , back + sedere, to SIT] 1. to dwell for a long time; have one s residence; live (in or at) 2. to be present or inherent; exist (in): said of qualities, etc. 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • reside — re|side [rıˈzaıd] v [I always + adverb/preposition] [Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: résider, from Latin residere to sit back, remain, stay , from sedere to sit ] formal to live in a particular place ▪ He spent most of his time in Rutherglen,… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • reside — verb 1) most students reside in apartments Syn: live in, occupy, inhabit, stay in, lodge in; formal dwell in, be domiciled in 2) the paintings reside in an air conditioned vault Syn: be situated, be found, be located, lie …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • reside — UK [rɪˈzaɪd] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms reside : present tense I/you/we/they reside he/she/it resides present participle residing past tense resided past participle resided formal to live in a particular place Phrasal verbs: reside in …   English dictionary


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